12 Days of Learning: Online Course Design

Atomic Learning has created the 12 Days of Learning, a series of articles designed to kick off resolutions to keep learning in the new year. We thought this was a great idea and have decided borrow (shamelessly steal) it and do our own. Today’s post looks at planning and designing an online course.  

When designing an online course there are several key elements you will need to consider. You will need to reimagine your course activities focusing on pedagogy first and technology second. It’s important to align your learning outcomes to your assessments and activities and pay careful attention to the selection of technology to achieve those outcomes without having it become about the technology.

Planning Your online course
This video from the University of New South Wales in Australia walks you through some useful strategies to begin planning your online course.  


 

Overview of the Course Design Process
This VoiceThread provides a brief overview of the eLIS course design process we use with Lesley faculty.

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12 Days of Learning: Designing Presentations

Atomic Learning has created the 12 Days of Learning, a series of articles designed to kick off resolutions to keep learning in the new year. We thought this was a great idea and have decided borrow (shamelessly steal) it and do our own. Day 8’s resource focuses on improving your presentation design.

We’ve all sat through boring, tedious presentations with too much text in too small of a font that we couldn’t read from our seats. So much so, that “Death by Powerpoint” is a thing.

Don’t do that. Instead, review these Atomic Learning tutorials on Effective Presentation Design below.

 

Effective Presentation Design

A. Presentations: What You Need to Know 

B. Getting Started

C. Communicating

D. Telling the Story

E. Getting Ready for Delivery

F. Resources

 

 

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12 Days of Learning: Library Tips

Atomic Learning has created the 12 Days of Learning, a series of articles designed to kick off resolutions to keep learning in the new year. We thought this was a great idea and have decided borrow (shamelessly steal) it and do our own. Today we’ll look to our colleagues at the Lesley Library.

Keyword Searching in Library Databases
Learn how to use keywords, AND, OR and truncation to create successful and more powerful searches in the library databases.

 

Scholarly Sources and Evaluating Information
Learn more about how to determine if a source is scholarly and will it be a useful resource.

For more assistance with these topics, check with Ask a Librarian.

 

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12 Days of Learning: VoiceThread Doodler

Atomic Learning has created the 12 Days of Learning, a series of articles designed to kick off resolutions to keep learning in the new year. We thought this was a great idea and have decided borrow (shamelessly steal) it and do our own. For our Day 4 post, let’s look at VoiceThread and the Doodler tool.

The Doodler tool in VoiceThread allows you to annotate your image or slide in VoiceThread using your mouse (or finger if you’re using a mobile device) to draw on the presentation area. It’s as if you had a pointer to direct the viewer’s attention to a specific area of the slide. All doodles will play back in time to your recorded voice so you can describe the detail you’re highlighting. Use the Doodler to annotate charts and images, sketch out a diagram or show someone how to solve a tricky math problem just as if you were with them in person. However, they can play it back as often as they need to in VoiceThread.

View the short overview video about the Doodler tool in VoiceThread below and access VoiceThread’s documentation for more information.

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12 Days of Learning: Assignments

Atomic Learning has created the 12 Days of Learning, a series of articles designed to kick off resolutions to keep learning in the new year. We thought this was a great idea and have decided borrow (shamelessly steal) it and do our own. For Day 3 of our series, learn how to collect, grade and return student assignments in myLesley.

Tired of searching through your email to find the assignments your students sent? Can’t find where you filed the graded version of their final paper? The Assignment tool in myLesley will allow your students to submit their coursework to a digital dropbox-style space. You can then view, provide feedback and return the graded assignment. myLesley will keep a record in the course of when the student submitted the file, your annotations and feedback, the grade and when you returned the graded assignment to them. Your students can access their feedback at any time by returning to the myLesley course site.

Learn more about how to use this powerful tool by viewing the tutorials below. assessments menu

Create an assignment 

Grade an assignment

 

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