Fall Bootcamp 2017: Teaching and Learning with Technology

Are you interested in adding more instructional technology to your course but not sure where to start? Jump into your fall teaching with a half-day learning technology bootcamp to learn how to effectively use technology in your course.

The workshop will consist of sessions on using the learning management system (Blackboard) to enhance your face-to-face course and hands-on experience with some of the technology tools you can use to enhance your course. Topics covered will include:

  • Using myLesley (Blackboard) to communicate with your students
  • Adding content to your myLesley course
  • Adding Video to myLesley (Kaltura)
  • VoiceThread

Event Details:
Tuesday, August 15, 2017: 1:00-4:00 PM
University Hall, 3rd Floor

Space is limited in this workshop! REGISTER by August 8th to reserve your seat. Click here to register.

Apply to the 2015 Summer Tech Institute!

image from summer tech instituteJoin your Lesley faculty colleagues for an exciting professional development opportunity!

The Summer Technology Institute is an opportunity for faculty to participate in a learning community across disciplines and schools engaged in an exploration of the effective uses of technology in teaching, learning, collaboration, and scholarship.  This event is sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the Center for Teaching, Learning and Scholarship, and organized by the eLearning and Instructional Support Division. To apply for the Summer Tech Institute, please complete the brief application form here.

The Summer Technology Institute, sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the Center for Teaching, Learning and Scholarship, is an opportunity for faculty to participate in a learning community of colleagues across disciplines and schools engaged in an exploration of the effective uses of technology in teaching, learning, collaboration, and scholarship.

Faculty who consider themselves basic users or do not currently use technology in their courses are especially encouraged to apply. All faculty — core or adjunct — are welcome!

A $500 stipend accompanies participation in the summer institute.

The program features a 4-day institute in June, held on the Brattle Campus. Here, faculty will engage in a rich mix of dialogue, hands-on practice, project-based learning, reflection, and application to explore innovative ways technology can be integrated into their teaching. Regular gatherings over the course of the academic year will extend conversations and deepen learning begun at the Summer Institute.

Examples of the types of workshops you will encounter at the Summer Tech Institute include:

  • Navigating the Technology Wilderness
  • Designing for Engagement
  • Google Tools: Collaboration Made Easy
  • Blackboard Beautification Project
  • Designing and Facilitating Online Discourse
  • Enhancing your Blackboard Course Site with Voice Tools

Expectations for Summer Technology Institute Participants

Faculty are expected to:

  • Participate in a 4-day training seminar: June 8-11, 2015
  • Develop a technology-enhanced learning activity for a 2015-2016 course
  • Attend at least 1 “brown bag” discussion workshops during the 2015-16 school year
  • Present a workshop or poster session at the January, 2016 eLearning Institute

Important Dates

March 13, 2015 Applications Due
March 31, 2015 Participants Announced
June 8-11, 2015 Summer Institute
January, 2016 eLearning Institute

Application

To apply for the Summer Technology Institute, please fill out the application form.

Looking at Technology on the “Horizon” for Higher Education

The NMC Project Initiatives ModelWith new technology developments in education constantly increasing and changing, how do you keep up with the latest technology trends for higher education? How do you decide which technologies to implement and how to do this effectively? Where can you find examples of what other universities and faculty are doing? One option is to read the 2014 Higher Education Edition of the Horizon Report, an annual publication of the New Media Consortium (NMC), in collaboration with the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI). This annual publication, released early this year, examines key trends, challenges, and specific emerging technologies or practices that are predicted to have a major impact on higher education over the next five years. An international panel of experts in education, technology, and related fields identify the topics that appear in the report.

The report identifies six key trends grouped by estimated time of impact, six significant challenges grouped by difficulty, and six emerging technologies grouped by estimated time of adoption (1 year or less, 2 to 3 years and 4 to 5 years).

To give some examples, the report identifies key trends such as the “Growing Ubiquity of Social Media” and the “Integration of Online, Hybrid and Collaborative Learning” as likely to drive changes in higher education over the next 1 or 2 years. Significant challenges, according to the report, include “Low Digital Fluency of Faculty” and “Keeping Education Relevant”.  Technology identified as having an important impact on higher education for the 1 year or less horizon include the “Flipped Classroom” and “Learning Analytics”.  To find out more about these and other trends, challenges, and technologies in the report, you can download a free copy of the report from the New Media Consortium (NMC) here. You can also find out more about the research process behind the report by checking out the Horizon Report’s wiki.

The Horizon Report encourages and inspires discussion and this past May I was able to attend a 2014 Horizon Report Symposium that was presented at NERCOMP (Northeast Regional Computing Program) in Norwood, MA. The symposium, organized and led by Bryan Alexander (one of the Horizon Report’s expert panelists), offered the chance to attend a presentation and to discuss the report and it’s implications with other higher education professionals, including educational technologists, instructional designers, IT professionals, librarians, administrators, and faculty.

The presentation was structured around Bryan Alexander’s wiki resource for the 2014 NERCOMP Horizon Report symposium, which includes links to related articles, websites, videos and more, as well as notes generated from the day’s discussion. Throughout the presentation, participants shared concerns, success stories, and even failures around the implementation of various new technologies. As is often the case, in the end more questions were probably raised then answered, but it’s always helpful to hear issues and examples from other professionals who are working with technology in education.

Following are some key takeaways from the event:

  1. It’s important to use new technology effectively to meet learning goals, rather than just for the sake of the new technology (even the most promising technology can be used poorly).
  2. There is a need to devise ways to support faculty in learning new technologies and help them to implement the technologies in effective and beneficial ways.
  3. There is a need to make sure the use of the technology is of benefit to the students and the learning process (especially in the case of technologies such as learning analytics).
  4. It’s also important to consider issues of concern, such as distraction (especially with social media and mobile devices), increased faculty workload, student privacy, and digital citizenship, among others.

A quick video overview of this year’s Horizon Report can be viewed at the New Media Consortium’s YouTube channel or below:

If you’d like to explore how some of the key trends and technologies from the Horizon Report can be applied to your own teaching (trends such as “The Growing Ubiquity of Social Media” or “Integration of Online, Hybrid and Collaborative Learning” and technologies such as the “Flipped Classroom”), contact eLIS at elis@lesley.edu.

Source for trends, challenges, and technology examples mentioned from the Horizon Report:

Johnson, L., Adams Becker, S., Estrada, V., Freemam, A. (2014). NMC Horizon Report:  2014 Higher Education Edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium.

Design Studios: Learning from Designing

design_studio
From integrating engineering projects into K-12 education to new problem-solving processes in business, design thinking is an idea that is finding its way into areas that previously did not include such an approach. Many educators are finding that design projects provide authentic collaborative learning opportunities.

Designing thinking can also guide one’s approach to planning a course. Designing an online or hybrid course for the first time can be extremely challenging. For instructors who someday may teach in these modalities, planning a “blended activity” for a face-to-face course is a useful learning experience that serves as a great preparation for online or blended teaching. This planning process, including thinking around technology integration, benefits from a collaborative problem-solving approach. During last June’s Summer Technology Institute hosted by eLIS, instructional designers worked with small groups of faculty on identifying and working on such design projects. The week-long time period for the Institute was conducive to such work because it allowed the inclusion of both individual reflective time and collaborative discourse. The important interplay between these learning and thinking modes supports the challenging work of transforming face-to-face learning experiences into online or blended ones.

We encourage faculty members to approach this work as experimental and to consider pilot-testing the design and learning from the first iteration. If you would to learn more about how eLIS can support work of this type, please, please contact elis@lesley.edu or email John McCormick or Sarah Krongard.

How to Apply for the 2014 Summer Technology Institute

By shopware AG [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia CommonsNote: To apply for the Summer Technology Institute, please fill out the application form.

The Summer Technology Institute, sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the Center for Teaching, Learning and Scholarship, is an opportunity for faculty to participate in a learning community of faculty across disciplines and schools engaged in an exploration of the effective uses of technology in teaching, learning, collaboration, and scholarship.

Faculty who consider themselves basic users or do not currently use technology in their courses are especially encouraged to apply.

A $500 stipend accompanies participation in the summer institute.

The program features a weeklong institute in June, held at Washburn Lounge on the Brattle Campus. Here, faculty will engage in a rich mix of dialogue, hands-on practice, project-based learning, reflection, and application to explore innovative ways technology can be integrated into their teaching. Regular gatherings over the course of the academic year will extend conversations and deepen learning begun at the Summer Institute.

Major topics addressed at the Summer Institute include:

  • Instructional Design
  • Technology-Enhanced Course Design Strategies
  • Use of Instructional Technology tools including myLesley (Blackboard, myLesley Voice Tools, Voicethread, Collaborate, and Blackboard Instant Messenger)

Expectations for Summer Technology Institute Participants

Faculty are expected to:

  • Participate in a 5-day training seminar: June 9-13, 2014
  • Develop a technology-enhanced learning activity for a 2014-2015 course
  • Attend at least 2 “brown bag” discussion workshops during the 2014-15 school year
  • Present a workshop or poster session at the 2015 eLearning Institute

Important Dates

March 7, 2014 Applications Due
March 31, 2014 Participants Announced
June 9-13, 2014 Summer Institute
January 2015 eLearning Institute

Application

To apply for the Summer Technology Institute, please fill out the application form.